Category Archives: Seasons

Winter is certainly here!

But, it took a long time to arrive.

I timed my final harvest of carrots down to about the last possible second.

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This was the first week of December and the ground hadn’t yet frozen.  If I had gotten to this job just a day or two earlier, it would not have involved snow.

As you can see, the chickens have been moved into their winter quarters inside the garden fence where I can run an extension cord to plug their coop in for supplemental light and a heated water dish.

The garlic seed is snugly tucked into the ground and poultry net has been strung around the garlic beds in case the chickens get over exuberant.

At this point, the sheep were still getting most of their nutrition from grazing.  As you can see here, the lawn was still quite green.  Plenty of forage was available in most of the pasture.  This is really remarkable.  Often, by mid October I am feeding hay because there is no forage left, but this year it just kept right on growing until it got covered with snow in early December.

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I take pasture photos at 6 standard locations on the first of each month as a form of research and record keeping.  This was the 12/1/16 photo of Paddock 1.

Today, we are experiencing a real winter deep freeze.  The benefit of weather so cold that I’m reluctant to step outside is that I do finally get around to the paperwork and computer projects that had been languishing when I was working on outside projects.

I’m very pleased to have finally made a bunch of updates to my little online store.  Have a look: https://squareup.com/store/autumn-larch-farm-llc.  There you will find soaps, sheepskins, raw fleeces, roving, yarn and more.

If you live nearby, save the postage and contact us to set up a time to stop in and do your shopping in person.  If you live farther away, this little online store is a great option for having a look at the products available and getting them delivered right to your door via USPS.

Stay warm and enjoy the vibrant sunshine that usually comes with the bitter cold.

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Filed under Farm, Fiber Arts, gardening, Getting Organized, Research, Seasons, Sheep

Happy New Year!

beautiful 2017 celebration greeting card design with fireworks

Designed by starline / Freepik

I hope 2017 brings you health, happiness and rewarding work.

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Filed under Family and friends, Health, Seasons

Thinking about Christmas in July

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I started my 2015 Christmas cards on December 11th after getting a brainstorm to see how many I could knit.  Really, really not enough time!  (Apologies to those reading this who received a plain old paper card from me last year!!)  I highly recommend allowing yourself a bit more time, therefore I’m sharing this suggestion in July.

My favorite resource for inspiration in all things knitting (besides my fiber friends and family) is Ravelry.com, so I went there to search for patterns and ideas and found many, many to choose from.

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I already had blank cards and stamping supplies on hand, so I started a knitting frenzy and whipped out quite a few cards in a relatively short time.  One lesson I learned and that I’m reminded of while looking at this picture, is that newsprint is not a good choice for a work surface.  The print can easily rub off onto the finished card.  Better to work directly on a table that can be cleaned off or use a blank sheet of newsprint or kraft paper.

Another consideration is the thickness of the finished card and envelop.  These squeaked in under the maximum thickness allowed for standard postage rates in the US, but if I had used a bulky yarn or had applied felted ornaments on my trees, etc. they might have been too thick and required extra postage to mail.  Check with your postal service for current rules and regs.

Each knitted tree, etc. doubles as an ornament.  I secured a single crocheted loop at the top of each one and threaded the loop through a small slit in the card using a yarn needle.  The recipient was able to either keep the ornament attached to the card or pull it free and hang it on their tree.

These were really fun to knit up and were well received.  If you decide to create some yourself, I would love to see the results of your creativity.

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Summer is sooo beautiful

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July 12, 2016 · 9:55 pm

Photos for research and record keeping

Back in 2012, I decided to take pictures once each month from 6 positions on our pasture as a record.  I was hoping to be able to document improvements in the pasture forage quality.  I think some of that is happening.  It has also been interesting to see how differently a pasture can look on the same day from one year to the next.

I have included May 1st and October 1st here, from one vantage point and through multiple years.  Both of those dates can be quite different depending on the amount of warmth, rain, snow, etc.

May 2012 illustrates the early and warm spring that we experienced that year.  May 2014 shows how long it took to recover from the ‘polar vortex’.  Rain was obviously plentiful in the early fall of 2014.

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Filed under Farm, Natural world, Research, Seasons

Spring Ephemeral Time in the Northwoods

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The Bloodroot right outside my back door is a true spring ephemeral – it emerges while the deciduous tree leaves are not yet shading the forest floor and virtually disappears later in the Spring.

Sanguinaria canadensis

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Ferns may not really be an ephemeral, but they are a lovely sign of Spring, none-the-less.

Osmundastrum cinnamomeum

I spend a great deal of time outside in the Spring, but only a little of that is spent wandering the woods.  We visited my parents at the lake in mid April and enjoyed a couple of hikes.  We spied wild leeks and just the barest beginning of the Dutchman’s Breeches (Dicentra cucullaria).

Travel Wisconsin has compiled a number of walks to enjoy the Spring wildflowers.  Maybe you can find one near you: http://www.travelwisconsin.com/article/things-to-do/spring-beauties-10-wildflower-walks-that-will-wow-you.

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Filed under Natural world, Seasons

Spring means lambing season

Our first lamb of 2015 was born 2 days ago.  And she is the first natural color lamb born on this farm!  And, she looks just like her papa.

Hoglah is such an attentive mother that she makes it hard to get any pictures.  Here is one taken inside of the pasture jug.

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Most of my attempts today resulted in this:

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Hoglah very deliberately placed herself between me and her little one.

But I did manage to catch a glimpse of the two together.  Mama enjoying the fresh green grass and some dandelion blossoms and her ewe lamb testing out her legs.

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New growth is popping out everywhere as seen here:

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American Plum (Prunus americana) Blossoms

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Tamarack (Larix laricina)

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Filed under Farm, Fiber Arts, Local Food, Natural world, Seasons, Sustainability

Christmas Cookies – gluten free

I needed cookies for a craft show I participated in recently that had a holiday theme.  I decided the gluten free cookies I prefer for myself would also be welcome to some of the shoppers at the craft show.  A friend who is a big fan of cut out cookies is also beginning an exploration of a life without wheat flour, so we teamed up for an afternoon of baking.  And, how nice, our holiday cookies are already safely stowed in the freezer!

We used the Leo’s Classic Sugar Cookies recipe from my copy of Karen Morgan’s Blackbird Bakery Gluten-Free.

cookies

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Winter too soon

Fortunately this young fella is well equipped for the winter that started here with a vengeance on Nov. 10th.  We all know wool keeps you warm even when it is wet.  With the snow, then rain, then snow again that occurred during that first winter storm, our sheep had snowballs frozen to their backs that rattled when they moved.  With shelter from the wind and plenty of feed, they are faring well.  The current predictions of a warm up with a little sunshine are welcomed by all of us.ram lamb 11_11_14

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Hay safely under cover… What a glorious feeling!

I’m learning that making hay is very stressful. Most of the stress has to do with moisture – rain, dew, humidity.

Because of moisture, I’ve added a new word to my vocabulary:

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/tedder

ted·der noun \ˈte-dər\

Definition of TEDDER: one that teds; specifically : a machine for stirring and spreading hay to hasten drying and curing

First Known Use of TEDDER: 15th century

I think of it as a “fluffer” for hay.  And, I was pleased to discover that there is one available in the neighborhood to rent because we had a bumper crop of clover this year.  Another thing I learned is that clover is loaded full of moisture and takes a really long time to dry.  Our hay might have molded if we hadn’t been able to use the tedder.

Raking hay after it is "fluffed" with a tedder is a challenge.

Raking hay after it is “fluffed” with a tedder is a challenge.

Rain held off!

Rain held off!

Well cured hay smells...Delicious!

Well cured hay smells…Delicious!

A rare sight: Farmer Jane on steel

A rare sight: Farmer Jane on steel

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Filed under Farm, Seasons